Master Policy Matrix

Select a Policy Area:
Goal
Advance jurisdiction-wide collaboration to continually refine nature-based climate solutions that sequester carbon, restore ecosystems, mitigate flooding, and conserve biodiversity.
Strategy Actions Source
Develop policies and procedures to assess carbon sequestration opportunities, prioritize biodiversity and green infrastructure, and maximize local native plants. By X year, City departments should develop their own policies and procedures for capital projects to assess carbon sequestration opportunities, prioritize biodiversity and green infrastructure, and maximize local native plants. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
By X year, develop best practices guidelines for improving or maintaining carbon sequestration and retention, while preserving biodiversity and ecosystem services, in the soil, plants, and natural habitats. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
By X year, complete a watershed carbon case study and quantify the value of carbon storage provided by protecting this natural area. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Proactively pursue nature-based and science-based planning, implementation, adaptation, and mitigation strategies for sea level rise and land subsidence. Require and incentivize green infrastructure in future developments and when possible, use green infrastructure as a preferred alternative. Sausalito General Plan
Wetlands Reversion - Consider developing an inventory of the city’s drainage system and assess for potential wetlands reversion to adapt to sea level rise. Sausalito General Plan
Under appropriate shoreline conditions, require or encourage development to use “soft” or “natural” solutions or “living shorelines” as an alternative to the placement of hard shoreline protection in order to protect development or other resources and to enhance natural resource areas. Examples of soft solutions include vegetative planting, dune restoration, and sand nourishment. California Coastal Commission: Sea Level Rise Adaptation Policy Guidance
Develop a program to work with public and private landowners to decrease the risk of flooding by advancing watershed management projects that reduce and/or store runoff during rainfall events, including the installation of green infrastructure and Low Impact Development (LID) practices, and improve the condition in the floodplain, for example through floodplain restoration or improvement. ABAG/BCDC: Stronger Housing Safer Communities Strategies
Restore and enhance parks, natural lands and large open spaces. By X year, explore expansion of the City’s natural areas preservation system through land transfers and acquisitions of undeveloped/unprotected private and public lands. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Coordinate cross-departmental collaboration on project design and implementation. Adopt a comprehensive and multi-departmental strategy to integrate greening into new city project planning and development. San Jose Urban Greening Roadmap
Maintain the carbon that is currently held in soil and plants. Support the implementation of forest management practices that protect existing carbon stocks by reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfire. At the same time, grow large, mature trees and move surplus biomass to the soil carbon pool via mulching in place, prescribed fire, conservation burns, and off site uses, including compost and mulch production.
Work with Open Space Districts on strategic land protection and stewardship actions that increase carbon sequestration and minimize conversion to land uses that have a lower capacity to sequester carbon.
Limit the conversion of open space and protected areas to developed land through enforcing and maintaining urban growth boundaries Plan Bay Area 2050
Goal
Implement regenerative land management practices at the city scale. Practice drawdown, reduce emissions, and improve watershed and human health.
Strategy Actions Source
Capture more carbon in soils and plants Support local agricultural producers to plan, implement, and scale carbon sequestration. Marin County Climate Action Plan
Increase our urban forest cover starting with communities impacted by recent fires and disadvantaged communities. Marin County Climate Action Plan
Conduct Carbon Sequestration farming pilot projects and research Pilot appropriate carbon sequestration techniques as part of ongoing ecological restoration of degraded habitats. Marin County Climate Action Plan
Ensure that agricultural easements have standards for Best Management Practices and prioritize conservation of agricultural properties that use or agree to implement regenerative agriculture practices. Greenbelt Alliance The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience
Improve the composting ordinance to advance compost infrastructure and support soil carbon sequestration activities. Marin County Climate Action Plan
By X year, pilot appropriate carbon sequestration techniques as part of ongoing ecological restoration of degraded habitats.
By X year, ensure highest and best use of compost made from organics collected from residents and businesses. Marin County Climate Action Plan
Goal
Integrate urban greening into planned and future city infrastructure projects, including road improvements, parks, and private development.
Strategy Actions Source
Utilize overlay zones, ordinances, or resolutions to create new urban greening zoning requirements in areas regarding flooding, habitat, or other priorities. Design roadway projects to be attractive and, where possible, to include trees, landscape buffer areas, public art, public space, and other visual enhancements. Emphasize tree planting and landscaping along all streets. San Rafael General Plan
Adopt EPA’s Storm Smart Cities guidance on how to include urban greening in LHMPs. EPA Storm Smart Cities
Incorporate urban greening in the CAP by establishing programs, timelines, and collaborations with agencies. Oakland CAP (CR-2 - CR-4)
Require sustainable landscaping practices and a rating system (such as the Bay-Friendly Rated Landscape Program from ReScape California) for new landscapes built within the jurisdiction. ReScape California
Maximize tree canopy coverage and other urban greening practices throughout the public realm. Maximize, where woody vegetation is appropriate, planting coast live oak and other native trees and shrubs throughout the public realm. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Plant X number of street trees (~25% increase) in the sidewalk tree wells to complete the street tree network by 2040. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Develop guidelines on specific tree species and management procedures that integrate carbon sequestration, ecosystems services, and biodiversity. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Establish requirements for major development and redevelopment projects to construct and maintain urban greening projects in the adjacent public right of way. Redwood City LID ordinance
By X year, create policy for land under the jurisdiction of the Department of Public Works to require preservation of mature trees during infrastructure modifications using solutions to retain them such as bulb-outs, basin expansion, and sidewalk re-routing. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Goal
Focus urban greening projects in areas lacking tree canopy and other urban greenery to provide health and safety benefits to residents, with a focus on vulnerable communities.
Strategy Actions Source
Ensure urban forestry plans focus resources on vulnerable communities. Map tree canopy gaps in cities and prioritize urban canopy expansion in communities vulnerable to urban heat effects, utilizing tools such as the Tree Equity Score. American Forests Tree Equity Score
Require greening in all new development and redevelopment that supports other community benefits, such as shade for walking and biking routes. Include greening elements as a primary project scoring criteria for bike improvements. San Jose Better Bike 2025
Focus green stormwater improvements for areas at risk of flooding with an emphasis on vulnerable communities. Map areas at risk of flooding, including those along creeks, low-lying, and coastal. Prioritize urban greening expansion in these spaces. FEMA Flood Maps , FEMA Risk MAPs
Goal
Pursue new funding mechanisms to support urban greening projects at the local and regional level.
Strategy Actions Source
Create new local financing mechanisms both for public and private development. Pursue stormwater infrastructure funding and financing options for multibenefit urban greening, including stormwater fees, developer impact fees, fees for offsite green stormwater infrastructure instead of onsite stormwater treatment, and Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts. Oakland Measure Q
Modify regional and state funding requirements to incentivize greening elements within transportation projects. Lobby state government and agencies for funding flexibility in state and regional transportation grant programs. San Francisco State Policy Priorities , San Jose Annual Legislative Priorities Item 6
Support state and regional funding strategies. Advocate for regional funding sources to support greening projects. LA Regional Measure W
Advocate for state grant programs to support local planning and project implementation. CA Urban Greening Program , Urban Flood Protection Grant Program , Strategic Growth Council's Portfolio Programs , CA Coastal Conservancy
Advocate for greening funding in any potential state climate resilience bonds.
Create permanent funding sources and mechanisms for nature-based solutions. "Establish alternative fee mechanisms, similar to the SF Carbon Fund, to fund nature-based solutions. By 2023, create permanent code and financial incentives for homeowners and other private landowners to preserve existing mature trees and shrubs and to plant local native species. " San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Goal
Develop a range of adaptation strategies that reflect “”protect””, “”accommodate””, and “”avoid”” approaches to sea level rise adaptation.
Strategy Actions Source
Accommodate: Reduce or prohibit development in the most hazardous areas. Hazards and climate impacts to consider are earthquake, liquefaction, flooding (riverine and sea level rise), groundwater rise, subsidence, landslide, and wildfire. Require new development to plan for and protect against 100-year storm events (42 inches total water level) plus an additional 36 inches of sea level rise. Ensure that the design of future developments incorporate flood protection measures to protect improvements from a 100-year storm event and anticipated sea level rise. D2 San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Sausalito General Plan , Alameda County Climate Action Plan
Preserve on-site natural elements in new development, when feasible, that contribute to the community’s native plant and wildlife species value and to its aesthetic character. City of Alameda Climate Action and Resiliency Plan
Consider incorporating sea level rise into the Flood Management section of the Building Code to encourage, incentivize, or require compliance with base floor elevation and flood-proofing requirements to mid-century sea levels. Consider unconventional design elements that may allow structures to accommodate a higher water table and higher liquefaction risks. City of Alameda Climate Action and Resiliency Plan
Establish a hazard or climate overlay zone. Apply an overlay zone to areas with the greatest current hazards and/or future climate impacts. Associate corresponding risk reduction,adaptation policies, and standards specific to the hazard or climate impact. Overlay zones should include development standards for appropriate risk mitigation measures like those found in the protect, accommodate, and consequence sections. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Develop adequate setbacks or buffers for new development. Establish setbacks or buffers to ensure structures are set back far enough away from known or likely hazardous locations, such that they will not be endangered over the life of the structure, without the use of protective devices. Establish general guidance and criteria for setbacks that consider impacts from climate change and establish the expected life of the structure. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Clearly define areas at risk. Include an updated inventory of potential pollutant sources due to sea level rise, including toxic waste sites, ocean outfalls, and wastewater treatment facilities at risk of inundation, as well as aquifers and wells at risk of saltwater intrusion. Policies may also be added to prioritize low-lying contaminated sites for remediation and restoration. California Coastal Commission
Maintain data on environmental hazards, such as soil and groundwater contamination and the vulnerability of the population to such hazards, using sources such as Cal Enviroscreen. Consider contamination hazards in concert with changing environmental conditions of SLR, groundwater rise, subsidence, and liquefaction that may mobilize or expose contaminants in new ways. San Rafael General Plan
Improve resilience planning for climate change, public health emergencies, and other community stressors among non-English speaking and lower-income populations. Increase awareness of sea level rise, groundwater rise, liquefaction, and flooding risks in vulnerable areas, as well as the importance of adaptation measures. San Rafael General Plan
Accommodate: Build infill, climate SMART multifamily housing instead of single family homes in greenfields. Encourage development of missing middle and higher density housing types instead of expanding single-family development. Los Gatos General Plan
Consider changes to the Municipal Code, including zoning regulations, that support houseboats, liveaboards, and other types of floating homes in areas designated as “Water” on the General Plan Map. San Rafael General Plan
Require water conservation features in all new developments including Xeriscape landscaping and low water use irrigation improvements. Use sustainable design practices including water‐saving systems and best management practices in developments. Promote the use of on‐site gray water and rainwater collection systems. Imperial Beach General Plan
Adopt a retrofit program to encourage or require installation of water conservation measures in existing businesses and homes. Tiburon Climate Action Plan
Encourage the installation of greywater and rainwater collection systems. Explore revisions to building codes that would facilitate such projects where obstacles currently exist. San Rafael General Plan
Encourage the use and integration of dual plumbing system hookups to accommodate recycled water into new development. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Consider effects on watershed areas, plant and wildlife habitats, and migration corridors before allowing development of any open space. Los Gatos General Plan
Accommodate: Require flood-proof construction methods, techniques, and mitigation. If it is infeasible for new development to avoid temporary flooding hazards with siting, development should be designed to minimize risks from flooding over the anticipated life of the development, and otherwise constructed using design techniques that will limit flood damage caused by storms. Amend local codes to require flood-proof construction techniques in structures in flood hazard zones. Ensure design considers function under future sea level rise conditions and incorporates best practices for stormwater management. Develop or amend the community’s stormwater ordinance to prioritize low-impact stormwater best practices for private realm properties and allow for low-impact development (LID) regional management for multiple properties. Such best practices can encourage stormwater capture and aquifer recharge and reduce site and regional runoff, improving water availability during drought periods, reducing flooding during high precipitation events, allowing for more creative development, best citing of facilities, and potential for reduced individual development costs. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Avoid: Implement a policy of retreat or managed retreat program for areas at-risk for repeated damage due to climate change hazards, such as areas of high subsidence, extreme wildfire risk, and floodplains to allow for natural modification of the landscape and reduction in risk to property and life. A Managed Avoid Program would include standards that trigger when development is relocated, modified, or removed. Identify thresholds or events that trigger a managed retreat action or new accommodate strategy. Actions may include the relocation or removal of vulnerable structures including the incremental relocation of structures on large lots, of structures off constrained lots, or the removal of structures and foundations. The policy may require consideration of existing nonconforming structure standards. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Identify priority areas for managed retreat to retain public access and sufficient beach area for recreational use; plan to relocate roads and infrastructure. Santa Cruz Climate Adaptation Plan
Implement measures to address the potential for loss or displacement of affordable or lower cost housing in the City’s climate change adaptation planning. San Rafael General Plan
Provide incentives to relocate development out of hazardous areas and to acquire at risk properties, where relocation is not feasible. May also consider an acquisition and buyout program which includes acquiring of land from the individual landowner(s) which are typically demolished or relocated with the property restored and future development on the land is restricted. Requires a supporting funding mechanism like a community land trust or repetitive loss program. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Allow a landowner reasonable interim use of property in areas where development is presently constrained by factors such as circulation system capacity, infrastructure, and natural hazards such as flooding. Ensure that zoning regulations include provisions for reasonable interim uses for properties where the highest and best use allowed by zoning is not presently attainable due to traffic capacity, infrastructure, natural hazards (including sea level rise),and other factors. Examples of reasonable interim uses include contractor’s yards, modular or mobile uses, new car storage, parking, and outdoor recreation. San Rafael General Plan
Identify and fund high-priority housing densification strategies in areas where managed retreat will be necessary and incentivize building that type of housing now.
Avoid: Establish a Transfer of Development Rights Program. Establish a Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) program, which could place permanent conservation or hazard mitigation easements on properties in high hazard areas to prevent or minimize the vulnerability of new development including but not limited to seismic, flooding, or wildfire hazards. These programs can provide compensation to property owners in areas with higher or increasing hazard exposure to relocate potential development to areas with less exposure to hazards. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Protect: Use agriculture and open space zoning to buffer development from hazards. Identify, map, and establish open space land-use designations in areas of high hazard that are also areas of significant habitat, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and ecological integrity. This could include restricting new development in areas next to coastal, riverine, or upper watersheds with co-benefit to improve ecosystem functions and reduce exposure to climate and/or seismic hazards. Streamline provisions within the community's zoning ordinance, including fees and internal routing for application approvals, to reduce barriers to use of the Williamson Act for preservation of agricultural lands and/or open space. This can aid in carbon sequestration, protection of food supply, inland floodplain protection, or sensitive habitats to offset costs and provide additional land to mitigate climate change impacts. The Williamson Act encourages the preservation of land for open space, forestry, and agricultural operations through an easement and reassessment of the property. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Adopt an Urban Growth Boundary (UGB), a line beyond which urban development is not allowed, through a voter approved ordinance, with limited exceptions for certain public facilities. The UGB will also be depicted on the Land Use Diagram, and, as a general rule, may not be amended for a specified length of time without a vote of the people. The boundary lines between most land-use designations are delineated as specifically as possible, generally following parcel lines. City of Winters
Support the preservation of agricultural and working lands, including rangelands, and restore forest lands, by limiting the conversion of these lands to residential or other uses through tools such as the creation of agricultural easements, particularly within high climate-hazard areas and Significant Ecological Areas. Los Angeles County Climate Action Plan Draft
Encourage land uses and improvements that reduce energy and water consumption, waste and noise generation, air quality impacts and support other comparable resource strategies for a sustainable City. Imperial Beach General Plan
Support regional watershed conservation through local land use planning, open space policies, and water quality conservation efforts. Emeryville General Plan
Goal
Harness the Power of Nature: Proactively pursue nature-based and science-based planning, implementation, adaptation, and mitigation strategies for sea level rise, groundwater rise, and land subsidence.
Strategy Actions Source
Encourage innovative nature-based protection measures where most practical and feasible, such as wave attenuation projects, natural reef development areas, and ecologically friendly measures to combat sea level rise. Allow construction that alters natural shoreline processes only when required to serve coastal-dependent uses or to protect existing structures or public beaches from erosion, and when designated to eliminate or mitigate adverse impacts on local shoreline sand supply. Santa Cruz Climate Adaptation Plan
Require new development and substantial redevelopment projects to minimize impacts to existing public access to and along the shoreline. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Consider developing an inventory of the city’s drainage system and assess for potential wetlands reversion to adapt to sea level rise. Sausalito General Plan
Develop a program to work with public and private landowners to decrease the risk of flooding by advancing watershed management projects that reduce and/or store runoff during rainfall events, including the installation of green infrastructure and Low Impact Development (LID) practices, and improve the condition in the floodplain, for example through floodplain restoration or improvement. ABAG/BCDC: Stronger Housing Safer Communities Strategies , Sausalito Climate Action Plan
Adapt the existing park and open space network to rising sea levels, more severe storm events and wave energy, and rising groundwater. Secure adequate and reliable funding for the development, rehabilitation, programming, and maintenance of parks, community and recreation facilities, trails, greenways, and open space areas. Sausalito General Plan
Establish a City ordinance requiring that project proponents explore the potential for nature-based adaptation measures before considering hardened structures, which can direct wave energy onto adjacent shorelines and exacerbate erosion. Require incorporation of ecologically friendly features along seawalls and hardened shorelines (when possible) and where shoreline hardening exists or is planned, including public access for people walking or bicycling on seawalls or levees. City of Alameda Climate Action and Resiliency Plan
Under appropriate shoreline conditions, require or encourage development to use “soft” or “natural” solutions or “living shorelines” as an alternative to the placement of hard shoreline protection in order to protect development or other resources and to enhance natural resource areas. Examples of soft solutions include vegetative planting, dune restoration, and sand nourishment. California Coastal Commission: Sea Level Rise Adaptation Policy Guidance
Encourage residents to replace water-intensive landscaping, such as grasses, with water-conserving landscaping through education and incentive programs Los Angeles County Climate Action Plan Draft
Support ongoing studies and monitoring of groundwater rise and subsidence.There is a strong need for additional data and monitoring of groundwater rise, subsidence, and water tables. Complete a geologic and/or hydrographic study that describes how the unique ground subsidence and liquefaction issues will interact with sea level rise. The study should include recommendations and implementation measures. Obtain subsidence data that will be used to inform a subsidence mitigation and adaptation study. Sausalito General Plan
Identify parcels that are affected by ground subsidence and monitor the extent of subsidence effects and if there are any related hazards to infrastructure or resources. Sausalito General Plan
Collaborate with regional subsidence mitigation measures and utilize regional funding mechanisms to resolve local issues. Sausalito General Plan
Prepare for the impacts of rising groundwater levels on private and public property. Develop a model of groundwater levels across the city, either by expanding and adopting regional groundwater models or creating a new model with more locally specific data. Model the impact of sea level rise and drought on groundwater and project its elevations and salinity at mid- and end of-century levels. City of Alameda Climate Action and Resiliency Plan
Complete a geologic and/or hydrographic study that describes how the City’s unique ground subsidence and liquefaction issues will interact with sea level rise. The study should include recommendations and implementation measures. Sausalito General Plan
Integrate groundwater rise into studies of sea level rise policies. Take an integrated planning approach that addresses rising seas and groundwater simultaneously, from the vulnerability and risk assessment phase through to adaptation implementation, is recommended. "Seek out opportunities to collaborate with agencies involved in monitoring the impacts of sea level rise on groundwater supplies and dynamics and liquefaction potential in the region." Imperial Beach General Plan
Protect the City’s groundwater from the adverse effects of urban uses and impacts from sea level rise. Encourage opportunities for groundwater recharge to reduce subsidence and water loss, and support water-dependent ecosystems. San Rafael General Plan
Goal
Provide for the current and long-range water needs of the community and for the protection of the quality and quantity of surface and groundwater resources.
Strategy Actions Source
Manage demand with efficiency and conservation. Implement management or policy measures to prevent, reduce, or eliminate risks to drinking water supply. Management options might involve ordinance provisions, prohibiting or restricting land uses that could release contaminants to critical source water areas—including sensitive groundwater recharge areas. Examples include prohibiting gas stations in source water protection areas or restricting the application of pesticides. San Rafael General Plan
Develop site design review criteria or zoning requirements that maximize pervious surface areas and vegetation in order to facilitate groundwater recharge and slow stormwater runoff. Castro Valley General Plan
Continue to monitor groundwater resources and investigate strategies for enhanced sustainable use. Areas where recharge potential is determined to be high shall be considered for designation as open space. Roseville General Plan
Reduce water use for municipal operations through water-efficient landscaping, maintenance of irrigation equipment, replacement of inefficient plumbing fixtures, and using recycled water where available and practical. San Rafael General Plan
Reduce near term drought shortages through water conservation and curtailment of water use, revise Emergency Water Rationing Plan, review and revise water department emergency plans to reflect climate change-related hazards. Santa Cruz Climate Adaptation Plan
Diversify local water supplies. Enhance or improve current water supply by providing a reliable water supply that meets long term needs while ensuring protection of public health and safety. desalination facility. Santa Cruz Climate Adaptation Plan
Pursue expansion of recycled water infrastructure and other alternative water supplies to meet water demands of the community that cannot be offset through conservation measures. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Invest in multi-benefit water management solutions that diversify and increase reliability of the water supply, reduce dependency on imported water, prioritize solutions that mimic natural systems, and maximize benefits to Native and disadvantaged communities. Los Angeles County Climate Action Plan Draft
Update and improve water conservation and efficiency programs, requirements, and incentives on a regular basis. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Encourage the installation of greywater irrigation or disposal systems. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Increase the availability of recycled water supply (i.e. purple pipes) and facilitate the installation of distribution facilities throughout the City to conserve potable water use. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Encourage innovative water recycling techniques such as rainwater capture and use of cisterns for outdoor watering purposes. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Maximize water conservation and efficiency upgrades through education, regulation, and incentives covering every aspect of water Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan
Create better systems for regional water planning, cooperation, and governance. Prepare a guidance document for incorporating sea level rise into the City’s capital planning process. Coordinate with water, sewer, energy, solid waste, and telecommunication service providers to prepare a plan for retrofitting critical infrastructure for rising sea levels, more intense storms, and other climate-related impacts. San Rafael General Plan
Work with the City water provider in exploring water conservation programs and encourage the water provider to offer incentives for water conservation. Claremont General Plan
Goal
Ensure fair and inclusive zoning policies that make housing accessible to everyone.
Strategy Actions Source
Prioritize Black, Indigenous, Peoples of Color (BIPOC) families in housing policies, outreach, and practice. Prioritize shelter, transitional, and affordable housing in cultural districts and other relevant geographies with historically marginalized racial or ethnic identities to encourage their stabilization. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Subsidize and develop incentives for building housing targeted towards vulnerable populations in high-opportunity areas, especially along transit-rich, commercial, and social service corridors. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Design public space, planned developments, and transportation systems to advance racial and social equity by co-developing processes with Black, Indigenous, Peoples of Color (BIPOC) communities and understand their needs before designing the space. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Goal
Increase density within existing communities in non-high fire severity zones.
Strategy Actions Source
Advance zoning and implementation changes that encourage sustainable, small and mid-sized, multi-family and workforce housing, especially in lower density neighborhoods. Provide financial assistance and education to lower income, small property owners to add housing (such as ADUs) and rehabilitate existing units that are healthy and resource efficient. San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Sausalito General Plan
Re-zone to allow for multi-family housing throughout the city and county. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Implement permit streamlining for new housing that exceeds current inclusionary and sustainability requirements. San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Sausalito General Plan
By X year, establish codes and regulations that facilitate use of new materials (e.g. cross-laminated-timber) and new technology (e.g. modular housing) to lower costs and increase resource efficiency of construction. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Expand green construction training and apprenticeship programs to grow the local pool of skilled labor and reduce construction costs. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Expand form-based zoning to increase multi-family housing in low-density neighborhoods near transit, jobs, services, parks, high-quality schools, and other amenities. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Increase heights and remove restrictions on density in non fire severity areas where existing or new high-capacity transit is planned to encourage housing and the creation of mixed-use corridors. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Increase the density and diversity of land uses across jurisdiction. Every five years, identify and assess under-utilized publicly owned land and roadways that could be transformed or repurposed. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Increase growth in high resource communities that are not prone to fire risk. Make sure wealthy communities are zoned for and build their fair share of both market rate and affordable housing, don't place affordable housing only in low income neighborhoods. San Jose General Plan
Promote the development of a 15-minute neighborhood to provide active, walkable, bicycle-friendly, transit-oriented, mixed-use urban settings for new housing and job growth attractive to an innovative workforce and consistent with the city’s environmental goals. San Jose General Plan
Fund transportation, transportation demand strategies, and electric charging stations as part of future development. Oakland Climate Action Plan
Implement parking policy zoning reform to eliminate or reduce the number of parking spaces a developer is required to build, instead making it market driven. Oakland Climate Action Plan
Goal
Manage the threat of climate risks on existing and future infrastructure and require nature-based solutions for climate resilience.
Strategy Actions Source
Reduce or prohibit development in the most hazardous areas. Hazards and climate impacts to consider are earthquake liquefaction, flooding (riverine and sea level rise), groundwater infiltration, landslide, and wildfire. This strategy can also expand to create beneficial uses, such as open space, flood mitigation and recreation, for non-developable high hazard lands. Require new development to plan for and protect against 42 inch 100-year storm events plus an additional 36 inches of sea level rise. Ensure that the design of future developments incorporate flood protection measures to protect improvements from a 100-year storm event and anticipated sea level rise. Sausalito General Plan , San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Alameda County General Plan
Consider permit streamlining for new housing that exceeds current green infrastructure requirements.
Preserve on-site natural elements in new development, when feasible, that contribute to the community’s native plant and wildlife species value and to its aesthetic character. Sausalito General Plan , San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Alameda County General Plan
Create zoning to require communities to be more wildfire resistant by establishing greenbelt zones for carefully landscaped areas inside and around neighborhoods and subdivisions, different from landscape-scale open space buffers and large fuel breaks. The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience (Greenbelt Alliance)
Require and/or incentivize green infrastructure in future developments and, when possible, use green infrastructure as a preferred alternative. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Restrict or limit construction of new development in zones or overlay areas that have been identified or designated as hazardous areas to avoid or minimize impacts to coastal resources and property from sea level rise impacts. SCAG's Climate Adaptation Model Policies for General Plans (2020)
Adopt (or renew) local policies that maintain space between cities including urban growth boundaries (UGBs), urban limit lines (ULLs), and community separators—preferably voter approved—to contain growth, prevent sprawl, and reduce wildfire risk. The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience (Greenbelt Alliance)
Goal
Prepare current and future communities for climate impacts.
Strategy Actions Source
Incorporate Climate Hazard Overlay Zones. Develop overlay designations to address potential future at-risk areas, such as areas prone to wildfire (that may not currently be within a State Responsibility Area or High-Risk Fire Hazard Severity Zone), subsidence, future floodplain or area of temporary inundation, or area at risk for high wind/storm events due to future climate change impact models. Incorporate these designations into the Safety Element, Local Hazard Mitigation Plan, and other planning for disaster response and emergency preparedness. SCAG's Climate Adaptation Model Policies for General Plans (2020)
Disclose current and future hazards. Review standards to ensure that new developments and substantial remodels in at-risk areas incorporate low-impact, resilient, infrastructure and are protected from potential impacts of flooding from sea level rise and significant storm events.
Develop policies that require residential property managers and landlords to disclose hazard risk information to renters in a manner similar to that required when residential properties are sold, including if the property is listed on a fragile housing inventory.
Require sellers of real estate to disclose permit conditions related to coastal hazards, property defects, or vulnerabilities, including information about known current and potential future vulnerabilities to sea level rise to prospective buyers prior to closing escrow.
Risk Reduction to existing development. Conduct an assessment that identifies housing units and neighborhoods in fire hazard severity zones that do not meet current fire safe building codes and develop retrofit programs that target highest risk areas, taking into consideration the increase in frequency and severity of wildfires due to climate change. SCAG's Climate Adaptation Model Policies for General Plans (2020)
Implement improvements to move or protect critical public assets threatened by sea level rise or rising groundwater. Alameda County General Plan
Protect housing affordability during recovery. Develop a community planning process to support rebuilding of affordable housing after a disaster, adopt policies to support the replacement of affordable housing units that have been damaged or demolished, and prioritize the deployment of interim housing in vulnerable communities. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Establish a Transfer of Development Rights program. Establish a Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) program, which could place permanent conservation or hazard mitigation easements on properties in high hazard areas to prevent or minimize the vulnerability of new development, including, but not limited to, seismic, flooding, or wildfire hazards. These programs can provide compensation to property owners in areas with higher or increasing hazard exposure to relocate potential development to areas with less exposure to hazards. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Implement a Managed Retreat Policy Implement a policy of Avoid or Managed Avoid program for areas at-risk of repeated damage due to climate change hazards, such as areas of high subsidence, extreme wildfire risk, and floodplains to allow for natural modification of the landscape and reduction in risk to property and life. A Managed Retreat Program would include standards that trigger when development is relocated, modified, or removed. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Goal
Encourage high-density development in infill locations to prevent increased sprawl and WUI development.
Strategy Actions Source
Support policies that emphasize development in safe infill locations, amending zoning regulations as necessary. Increase development potential in high-resource infill locations through upzoning, streamlined permitting procedures, and fee exemptions (where appropriate).
Prioritize infill development opportunities and the reuse of existing vacant commercial space to grow the city’s base of residents and employment to ensure long-term fiscal sustainability and promote conservation of natural open space. Diamond Bar General Plan Land Use and Economic Development
Goal
Accelerate greenbelts as nature-based solutions to wildfire resilience and risk reduction.
Strategy Actions Source
Prioritize increasing greenbelts as strategic locations for wildfire defense through policy and planning. Identify existing greenbelts and the best locations for new greenbelts for wildfire defense and risk reduction. Incorporate these locations into comprehensive wildfire planning at regional, county, city, and community levels and in all Municipal Service Reviews. The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience (Greenbelt Alliance)
Adopt (or renew) local policies that maintain space between cities including urban growth boundaries (UGBs), urban limit lines (ULLs), and community separators—preferably voter approved—to contain growth, prevent sprawl, and reduce wildfire risk.
Identify and maintain access to low-risk fire safety areas, including locations that may serve as temporary shelter or refuge during wildfire events. Cloverdale General Plan Policy Document
Communities and new developments should incorporate greenbelt zones and recreational zones into the design and placement of homes in a way designed specifically to reduce wildfire risk. Create zoning to require communities to be more wildfire resistant by establishing greenbelt zones for carefully landscaped areas inside and around neighborhoods and subdivisions, different from landscape-scale open space buffers and large fuel breaks. The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience (Greenbelt Alliance)
Require that residential subdivisions be planned to conserve open space and natural resources, protect agricultural operations including grazing, increase fire safety and defensibility, reduce impervious footprints, use sustainable development practices, and, when appropriate, provide public amenities. San Diego County General Plan Land Use Element
Subdivisions within State Responsibility Area (SRA) high and very high fire severity classification areas shall explicitly consider designs and layout to reduce wildfire hazards and improve defensibility. For example, requiring clustering of lots in defensible areas, managed greenbelts, water storage, perimeter roads, firesafe roadway layout and design, slope development constraints, fuel modification plans, and vegetation setbacks. Humboldt County General Plan Safety Element
Site subdivisions relative to landscape features that can act as buffers from oncoming wildfires (like lakes, agricultural lands, and maintained parks and greenbelts). Building to Coexist with Fire: Community Risk Reduction Measures for New Development in California
Preference vegetation that has relatively high water content in vegetated areas serving as greenbelts or wildfire buffers to avoid ignition. Building to Coexist with Fire: Community Risk Reduction Measures for New Development in California
Explore feasibility of a new Community Wildfire Resilience Zone around communities in high fire risk areas. Assess feasibility of creating a Community Wildfire Resilience Zone in the one-quarter-mile area around communities in high and very high fire hazard severity zones to promote responsible land uses, guide land stewardship activities, and provide permanent and consistent risk reduction.
Enhance stewardship on greenbelts to return beneficial wildfire regimes and increase overall wildfire resilience of the landscapes. Establish best management practices for natural and working lands by habitat types to restore beneficial wildfire regimes, managing natural and working lands in ways that are sensitive to native habitats while increasing urban greening and carbon sequestration to the greatest extent feasible.
Encourage land management plans to incorporate prescribed burning, selective harvest, non-commercial thinning, and traditional forest treatment as practiced by tribes.
Encourage open space preservation and conservation of sensitive areas within natural and working lands, including wildlands, to achieve multiple benefits including (but not limited to) species and habitat protection, agricultural and forest resource protection, water quality, carbon sequestration and storage, and wildfire hazard and risk mitigation. OPR Fire Hazard Planning Technical Advisory
Create a Wildland Fire Suppression Benefit Assessment District to fund vegetation management efforts, support defensible space maintenance on private property, and create fire breaks, greenbelts, and staging areas in strategic locations. Santa Barbara Resolution
Goal
Update land-use policies and regulations to increase wildfire resilience, including updating and strengthening WUI land use and building codes.
Strategy Actions Source
Minimize development in locations where fire risk is significant, or where multiple hazards (earthquake, landslide, etc.) overlap. Require proposed developments in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI), including the Very High Fire Hazard Severity zone, to investigate a site’s vulnerability to fire and to minimize risk to the greatest extent feasible. Santa Rosa General Plan
Regulate development in and adjacent to areas with steep canyons, arroyos and fire-prone vegetation. Santa Cruz General Plan
Avoid expanding new development, critical facilities, and infrastructure in areas subject to extreme threat or high risk, such as High or Very High FHSZs or areas classified by CAL FIRE as having an Extreme Threat classification on Fire Threat maps, unless all feasible risk reduction measures have been incorporated into project designs or conditions of approval. OPR Fire Hazard Planning Technical Advisory
Update local zoning and subdivision codes to designate wildfire hazard overlay zones and associated conditional use, site development standards, and design criteria to mitigate wildfire hazards and reduce risks to new development within the overlay zones. OPR Fire Hazard Planning Technical Advisory
Design new development to minimize fire hazards. Densities, land uses, and site plans should reflect the level of wildfire risk and evacuation capacity at a given location. San Rafael General Plan
Build safer in the WUI by making new development more resilient to wildfire. Require all new developments in high and very high FHSZs to complete and implement a wildfire mitigation plan specific to that development, subject to review and approval by the City, which shall be incorporated as part of the development plan approved for that development. Palm Coast Comprehensive Plan and Vision Statement
Update local ordinances to create a wildfire overlay zone including special conditions for development in these areas and work with the County to also participate in the overlay zone for their development in these areas. Smithfield City General Plan
Require clustering of planned development to protect natural resources and views and allow for siting that is sensitive to adjacent uses. Santa Cruz General Plan
Require new development in areas susceptible to wildfires to be responsible for fire prevention activities (e.g., visible house numbering and use of fireresistant and fire-retardant building and landscape materials) and to also provide a defensible zone to inhibit the spread of wildfires. Santa Cruz General Plan
Require stronger standards for existing development and support uniform standards and resilient growth management strategies for towns and cities with homes currently located in the WUI. Implement Municipal Code standards to reduce fire hazards in high fire risk areas, including enforcement of vegetation management requirements and the designation of a Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) Zone. Periodically update these standards and the WUI map to implement Wildfire Action Plan measures and other programs to further reduce wildfire risks. San Rafael General Plan
Conduct thorough review of all community regulations to identify all provisions that impact wildfire mitigation and then ensure that proposed WUI regulations are consistent with existing standards. NFPA Community Wildfire Safety Through Regulation
Create local defensible space requirements and guidelines that are aligned with both state mandates and with existing local law. This may take the form of clearly delineating ignition zones and maintenance requirements and should likely be accompanied by penalties for non-compliance. NFPA Community Wildfire Safety Through Regulation
Implement policies and programs that allow for safe, efficient, and effective evacuation and refuge. Update existing emergency preparedness and response plans and conduct community-facing exercises to enhance disaster preparedness and build local capacity to better address and mitigate health and safety impacts resulting from wildfires. OPR Fire Hazard Planning Technical Advisory
Adopt Fire-Safe Road Regulations that go beyond state minimums to ensure safe evacuation routes and accessibility by firefighting equipment. Consider regulations that also establish vegetation management practices along high-risk roadways. Apply fire-safe roads regulations to all new residential, commercial, and industrial development in the SRA and LRA (VHFHSZ).
Study and identify evacuation routes in WUI locations. Then develop a plan for ensuring evacuation routes are able to accomodate safe ingress and egress during emergency events.
Goal
Maintain partnerships and incorporate complimentary programs with regional jurisdictions, tribal governments, and property owners to incentivize coordinated risk reduction, enhance compliance and enforcement with existing policies.
Strategy Actions Source
Plan and develop mechanisms to enable wildfire mitigation and land management activities at a regional and community scale. Develop mechanisms for working with neighboring cities to coordinate mitigation efforts and jointly advocate for, plan for, and implement vegetation management, fire-safe roads, safe evacuation routes, and other fire mitigation strategies that have impacts across jurisdictions. Pursue MOUs, working groups, or special districts for coordinating efforts.
Consider forming a Fire Safety Committee, or equivalent, bringing together the multiple local, state, and federal fire districts and agencies countywide to review the effectiveness of the fire protection policies in the General Plan and Municipal Code at least once every five years. Calaveras County General Plan Safety Element
Establish mechanisms to maintain partnerships with tribal governments, state, local, and federal agencies to identify, prioritize, and implement fire prevention and protection measures. Santa Barbara County Comprehensive Plan Seismic Safety & Safety Element
Encourage communities to participate in the FireWise USA program, which has been successful in empowering communities to manage their own fire risk through mitigation and eduation activities. Actions taken through FireWise have even been paried with insurance coverage in some locations. APA Multihazard Planning Framework for Communities in the Wildland-Urban Interface
Ensure that all public and private property owners are maintaining the mandated defensible spaces and wildfire-related policies are being implemented. Conduct annual defensible space inspections and enforce compliance with state and local fire codes. Consider partnerships with community and neighborhood organizations as well as the local Fire Department to educate property owners and incentivize compliance.
Develop incentives, such as certification programs, for homeowners who go beyond minimum building codes and standards that can help reduce insurance costs.
Develop a comprehensive WUI risk reduction program and associated funding/financing for existing development to improve defensible space, increase home and structural hardening, and increase vegetation and fuels management in wildland areas adjacent to existing development. OPR Fire Hazard Planning Technical Advisory
Develop a wildfire preparedness document where all policies and recommended actions are compiled. This can serve as a reference for policy-makers and elected officials.
Goal
Create equitable processes for executing climate resilience policies, where justice is central to the policy design and implementation.
Strategy Actions Source
Recognize the role that institutions have played in the marginalization of frontline communities and uplift the responsibility elected officials have to remediate harm, transform the system, and uphold democratic practices. Acknowledge marginalization as the status quo practice of current systems that have been historically designed to exclude certain populations, namely low-income communities, communities of color, women, youth, previously incarcerated people, and queer or gender non-conforming community members. This understanding is important because if concerted efforts are not made to break-down existing barriers to participation, then by default marginalization occurs. The Spectrum of Community Engagement to Ownership by Facilitating Power
Create developmental stages that allow the City to recognize where they are at, and set goals for where they can go through conscious and collective practice. This is key to transforming systems and building capacity for communities currently impacted by poverty, pollution, and political disenfranchisement to have increasingly more control over the resources needed to live, such as food, housing, water, and energy. The Spectrum of Community Engagement to Ownership by Facilitating Power
Design community engagement pathways that take into considerations all of the different factors that can deter people from being included in planning processes, use approaches appropriate for the community. Allocate sufficient time and opportunities for engagement to avoid rushing the process and tokenizing community participation. This will promote capacity building so that community stakeholders are able to provide meaningful feedback and decisions. CEJA SB1000 Toolkit
Prepare public notices and other materials in the predominant language(s) spoken in the community and provide interpretation services at meetings as needed. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Make public notices and other important documents available in print at local libraries, community centers, or other gathering places. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Schedule, format, and locate community workshops and meetings to be convenient for community members and provide childcare. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Use social media, virtual meeting platforms, and other communication techniques for those without time or ability to attend public meetings Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Consider data that reflects the economic, gender, age, and racial diversity of the affected population. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Clearly explain potential adverse impacts of a proposed project in plain language that is easily understood by the target community. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Establish an ongoing environmental justice advisory group comprised of community members from disadvantaged communities to advise and assist the County in addressing disproportionate health, safety, and welfare in disadvantaged communities. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Support community events, such as block parties and community service days, that support social connections, neighborhood identity, and behavioral health. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Identify, initiate, and formalize partnerships with community organizations and leaders in disadvantaged communities to ensure that local residents can make significant contributions to planning processes. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Ensure that public comment is prioritized with the first hour of a public meeting in order to yield best community participation. Expand the range of engagement methods used with communities in meetings by using tools such as live chat options that can capture community voice. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Design capacity-building workshops to support community-driven policy development and to lead to the translation of community priorities into policy, policy reform language, and technical tools. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Go to places where people already gather to allow community members to give input at a time that is convenient for them and without a large time commitment. Meeting stakeholders in locations they are familiar and comfortable with can also help to bridge cultural and trust gaps. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Co-develop equity metrics (or planning to implement pre-existing metrics). Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Co-fundraise with community-based organizations. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Co-plan community engagement events and activities with community based organizations (CBOs) Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Goal
Ensure everyone has access to housing in a way that takes into consideration the systematic disenfranchisement of frontline communities and addresses the root causes of the housing crisis.
Strategy Actions Source
Advance zoning and implementation changes that encourage sustainable, small and mid-sized, multi-family, and workforce housing, especially in lower density neighborhoods. Prioritize affordable housing in cultural districts and other relevant geographies with historically marginalized racial or ethnic identities to encourage their stabilization. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Amend the zoning ordinance to ensure that the City requires zoning to facilitate emergency shelters and limits the City’s ability to deny emergency shelters and transitional and supportive housing under the Housing Accountability Act. The Zoning Code can include locational and operational criteria for homeless shelters such as hours of operation, provisions for operations and management, and compliance with County and State health and safety requirements for food, medical and other supportive services provided on-site. Richmond General Plan 2030 Housing Element
Provide financial assistance and education to lower income, small property owners to add housing (such as ADUs) and rehabilitate existing units that are healthy and resource efficient. San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Sausalito General Plan
Implement permit streamlining for new housing that exceeds current inclusionary and sustainability requirements. San Francisco Climate Action Plan , Sausalito General Plan
Expand form-based zoning to increase multi-family housing in low-density neighborhoods near transit, jobs, services, parks, high quality schools, and other amenities. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Ensure housing and protections for housing during climate hazard events. Consider measures to address the potential for loss or displacement of affordable or lower cost housing in the City’s climate change adaptation planning. San Rafael General Plan
Work with community-based organizations to develop and support temporary housing solutions for lower-income immigrants, older adults, and other at-risk groups during and after an emergency. San Rafael General Plan
Provide incentives to relocate development out of hazardous areas and to acquire at risk properties, where relocation is not feasible. May also consider an acquisition and buyout program which includes the acquiring of land from the landowner(s) which are typically demolished or relocated with the property restored and future development on the land is restricted. Requires a supporting funding mechanism like a community land trust or repetitive loss program. MTC Resilient Housing Policies
Equitable access to safe and sanitary homes among all communities so that no resident has to live in an unsafe or unhealthy place. Ensure that future improvements in disadvantaged communities will not produce a net loss of affordable housing or the displacement of residents. In order for an application for a major development project to be deemed complete, require applicants to document to the City's satisfaction how the project will promote environmental justice, including how the project will ensure the following: - Its costs and benefits will be shared equitably; - Its economic opportunities will be shared equitably; - It will not displace existing residents or businesses in disadvantaged communities; - It will avoid direct, indirect, or unintended negative impacts on the quality of life of residents within disadvantaged communities; - Prioritize clean-up of illegal dumping in disadvantaged communities. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Obtain funding for, address barriers to, and increase participation in the weatherization program for extremely low, very low, and low-income homeowners, landlords, and renters, as well as in other programs to provide resources to bring older properties up to Code and improve their livability. Make minor home repairs and energy improvements, and improve health and quality of life. Focus these resources on homes in disadvantaged communities, and in particular rental housing and high density housing. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
In collaboration with nonprofit and for-profit developers, obtain funding for and establish community land trusts serving each disadvantaged community that will support long-term community ownership and housing affordability. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Expand the first-time homebuyer program to provide more education and assistance, prioritizing outreach and marketing in disadvantaged communities to spread awareness of the program. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Incentivize and streamline public and private investment in new development or redevelopment that promotes community goals in disadvantaged communities, as identified in the community profiles. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
For projects that would significantly impact a disadvantaged community, pursue community benefits agreements that achieve the goals identified in the community profile. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
By X year, establish codes and regulations that facilitate use of new materials (e.g. cross-laminated-timber) and new technology (e.g. modular housing) to lower costs and increase resource efficiency of construction. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Assist low-income homeowners in maintaining and improving residential properties through housing rehabilitation and energy efficiency assistance programs Provide financial support to non-profit organizations providing fair housing services. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Promote the development of a 15 minute neighborhood to provide active, walkable, bicycle-friendly, transit-oriented, mixed-use urban settings for new housing and job growth attractive to an innovative workforce and consistent with the city’s environmental goals. San Jose General Plan
Goal
Transform our system beyond extractive practices to one that prioritizes a healthy environmental, high quality jobs, and a green economy, without leaving anyone behind.
Strategy Actions Source
Take a holistic and all encompassing approach to phase out fossil fuels while leaving no one behind. Until fossil fuel industries are phased out, require any proposed project requiring a use permit for a fossil fuel industry or its accessory infrastructure that would impact a disadvantaged community to include early and substantial community engagement as part of the permitting process. As conditions of approval, such projects must include substantial community benefits that support the goals identified in the community profile. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
In coordination with impacted communities, workers, and business/industry, develop and implement a plan to phase out fossil fuel and other highly polluting industries and transition to just, equitable, and clean industries that offer fair or living-wage jobs. The plan should address site remediation responsibility and strategies to improve the health, safety, infrastructure, job opportunities, and revenue opportunities during the shift to a zero emission/clean energy economy, paying special attention to helping develop new opportunities for how disadvantaged communities will realize economic, health, and other benefits. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Expand access to green jobs, general workforce development, and other economic mobility opportunities. Collaborate to develop a “Just Transition” plan and task force that examines the impact of the transition to a cleaner economy on disadvantaged workers, identifies strategies for supporting displaced workers, and develops recommendations for ensuring inclusive employment practices within growth sectors of the economy. pLAn LA
Expand green construction training and apprenticeship programs to grow the local pool of skilled labor and reduce construction costs. San Francisco Climate Action Plan
Create workforce development and education training programs with career pathways for residents of the project area. Education and training can include pre-apprenticeship programs that are tied to state-certified apprenticeships; training programs that lead to occupations and industries that support proposal implementation, reduce barriers for and reflect the range of employment readiness needs of local residents and individuals with employment barriers, and partner with local workforce development boards and other key stakeholders, including organized labor and education providers; align and enhance high-performing education and training programs that have a proven record of leading to industry-recognized credentials and labor market advancement. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Goal
Design healthy resilient neighborhoods that have the tools to protect residents from a multitude of climate hazards, especially frontline communities that are the most vulnerable to risk. Make sure these places are spaces that reflect the physical and mental needs of residents, creating opportunities for growth and community solidarity.
Strategy Actions Source
Invest in urban greening projects that improve the physical well-being of communities and protect against risks such as extreme heat and days with poor air quality. Prioritize new street tree plantings and increase the tree canopy in disadvantaged communities, in particular areas with a high heat index. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Increase urban forest cover starting with communities impacted by recent fires and disadvantaged communities. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Map tree canopy gaps in cities and prioritize urban canopy expansion in communities vulnerable to urban heat effects, utilizing tools such as the Tree Equity Score. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Prepare an urban forest master plan for the county that includes quantified goals and tracking methods, prioritizing disadvantaged communities. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Develop and implement a plan to provide clean air refuges like a climate resilience hub during times when outdoor air quality is unhealthy. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Preserve, restore, and enhance natural landscapes in and near disadvantaged communities for their role in improving air quality and community health. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Decrease contamination and pollution, prioritizing frontline communities. Advocate for and coordinate with local and regional agencies in efforts to remediate or treat contaminated surface water, groundwater, or soils in or affecting disadvantaged communities. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Maintain data on environmental hazards, such as soil and groundwater contamination and the vulnerability of the population to such hazards, using sources such as Cal Enviroscreen. San Rafael General Plan
Increase the density and diversity of land uses across jurisdiction. Explicitly specify in polices and grant programs how much of the project budget can go towards the following activities: community engagement, outreach, workforce development, and capacity building (including technical assistance) Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
To the extent feasible, give priority to multi-benefit recreational projects that maximize pollution reduction and adaptation, carbon sequestration, heat-island reduction, stormwater capture that increase infiltration, habitat protection and biodiversity, community health improvements, promote innovative public-private partnerships, or a combination thereof. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Design public space and the transportation system (including roadways) to advance racial and social equity by co-developing public spaces with Black,Indigenous, People of Color community members and understanding their needs before designing the space. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Build community capacity/knowledge around issues of climate adaptation. Create and deliver a range of resources to train residents, city gardening staff, and other institutions on how to incorporate biodiversity, soil, and carbon sequestration techniques into landscaping and gardening projects. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Protect against eco-gentrification and other unintended harms that may come with community improvement projects. Provide priority access to housing developed for community residents and those who have been displaced. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Include displacement avoidance language to ensure that any efforts designed to implement the policy or grant program project are aware of the threat of displacement and build anti-displacement strategies into the effort. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Increase equitable access to safe, affordable, clean, multi-modal transportation. Support improvements to transit, bikeways, and sidewalks in disadvantaged communities to make active transportation more accessible and user-friendly while decreasing vehicle speeds, congestion, and air pollution. Prioritize infrastructure projects identified in disadvantaged community profiles. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Develop a program to establish, maintain, and enforce truck routes in the unincorporated county. This program should establish criteria for designating truck routes, signage, and enforcement mechanisms. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Protecting neighborhoods from multiple climate threats. Implement improvements to move or protect critical public assets threatened by sea level rise or rising groundwater. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Incorporate procedures into emergency and hazard mitigation plans to take care of vulnerable populations during hazardous events. Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs: A Guidebook
Identify vulnerable populations (such as non-English speaking residents, frail older adults, young children, and persons with disabilities) that may need assistance in times of disaster. Develop outreach programs that are geared toward these populations, including multilingual communications. San Rafael General Plan
Improve resilience planning for climate change, public health emergencies, and other community stressors among non-English speaking and lower-income populations. Increase awareness of sea level rise and flooding risks in the Canal area and in other vulnerable areas, as well as the importance of adaptation measures. San Rafael General Plan
Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands, territories, and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied, or otherwise used or acquired. Land rights, recognition, and repatriation should be considered in direct and specific engagement with Tribal Governments through a formal engagement process and alignment with Tribal Government priorities and decisions when identifying greenbelt lands for permanent protection, particularly when public funds are at play. Greenbelt Alliance The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience
Consult Tribal Governments at every step in identifying and stewarding greenbelts for wildfire defense and resilience and incorporate traditional knowledge. Greenbelt Alliance The Critical Role of Greenbelts in Wildfire Resilience
The County should strive to maintain partnerships with tribal governments, state, local, and federal agencies to identify, prioritize, and implement fire prevention and protection measures in the County. Santa Barbara County
Provide an opportunity for communities to negotiate environmental priorities and projects through community benefits agreements, for example creating public green spaces, adopting sound design standards, or installing green infrastructure and rooftop solar when possible. Contra Costa General Plan (forthcoming)
Protect and increase access to natural resources in tandem with necessary climate adaptation. If a city has a coast line, provide physical access to coastal resource areas for all segments of the population. Imperial Beach General Plan
Secure adequate and reliable funding for the development, rehabilitation, programming and maintenance of parks, community, and recreation facilities, trails, greenways, and open space areas. Sausalito General Plan , Sausalito Climate Action Plan
For projects that would significantly impact a disadvantaged community, pursue community benefits agreements that achieve the goals identified in the community profile. Sausalito General Plan , Sausalito Climate Action Plan
Invest in multi-benefit water management solutions that diversify and increase reliability of the water supply, reduce dependency on imported water, prioritize solutions that mimic natural systems, and maximize benefits to Native and disadvantaged communities. pLAn LA
Require new development and substantial redevelopment projects to minimize impacts to existing public access to and along the shoreline. Hermosa Beach Integrated General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan